AIDS, a collection of infections and cancers, people with HIV develop

Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a collection of infections and cancers that people with HIV develop.

Human Immuno deficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus which takes over the body cells and produces new HIV retrovirus. When someone becomes infected with the HIV virus it begins to attack their immune system.

The body’s immune system cells are destroyed, allowing pathogens and cancers which the body might have fought off normally to pose a serious threat to infected individuals due to a significant drop in their resistance levels.

This process is not visible and a person who is infected can look and feel perfectly well for many years and they may not know that they are infected. As their immune system weakens they become more vulnerable to illnesses that their immune system would normally have fought off. As time goes by they are likely to become ill more often.

HIV can be transmitted via a variety of means, from unprotected sex (most common method of transmission) to blood transfusions to sharing of needles. Pregnant mothers may also transmit the virus to their unborn child.

HIV symptoms (which often appear many times months after the infection) are similar to flu symptoms, and may disappear after some time. HIV may remain dormant and asymptomatic for years until it surfaces suddenly. MORE UNI BM SJC RN

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